“Attack” by Siegfried Sassoon

First Day on the Somme Anniversary Special:
World War I commands a darkness incomparable.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Attack”

Siegfried Sassoon

At dawn the ridge emerges massed and dun
In the wild purple of the glow’ring sun,
Smouldering through spouts of drifting smoke that shroud
The menacing scarred slope; and, one by one,
Tanks creep and topple forward to the wire.
The barrage roars and lifts. Then, clumsily bowed
With bombs and guns and shovels and battle-gear,
Men jostle and climb to meet the bristling fire.
Lines of grey, muttering faces, masked with fear,
They leave their trenches, going over the top,
While time ticks blank and busy on their wrists,
And hope, with furtive eyes and grappling fists,
Flounders in mud. O Jesus, make it stop!

“Memorial Day (Newfoundland and Labrador)” from Wikipedia

First Day on the Somme Anniversary Special:
The fact of World War I taints every joy forever.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Memorial Day (Newfoundland and Labrador)”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Memorial Day is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces of the Canadian province Newfoundland and Labrador in times of war, specifically since the First World War. It is observed concurrently with Canada’s national holiday, Canada Day. Memorial Day is observed on July 1 to recall the losses of Dominion of Newfoundland at Beaumont-Hamel during the Battle of the Somme of the First World War and has been observed annually since 1917.

During the First World War Newfoundland was a largely rural Dominion of the British Empire with a population of 240,000, and not yet part of Canada. The Royal Newfoundland Regiment was deployed at Suvla Bay on the Gallipoli peninsula with the 29th British Division in support of the Gallipoli Campaign. With the close of the Gallipoli Campaign the regiment spent a short period recuperating before being transferred to the Western Front in March 1916. In France, the regiment regained battalion strength in preparation for the Battle of the Somme. The infantry assault was to begin on 1916 July 1 and at 8:45 a.m. the Newfoundland Regiment and 1st Battalion of the Essex Regiment received orders to move forward. So far as can be ascertained, Continue reading