“Tomb of Orcus” from Wikipedia

An ancient tomb in Italy bears the only known picture of a mysterious monster of the underworld.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Tomb of Orcus”

Wikipedia

The Tomb of Orcus (Italian: Tomba dell’Orco), sometimes called the Tomb of Murina, is a 4th-century BCE Etruscan hypogeum (burial chamber) in Tarquinia, Italy. Discovered in 1868, it displays Hellenistic influences in its remarkable murals, which include the portrait of Velia Velcha, an Etruscan noblewoman, and the only known pictorial representation of the daemon Tuchulcha. In general, the murals are noted for their depiction of death, evil, and unhappiness.Tomb of Orcus mural chthonic daemon Tuchulcha and hero These Theseus in underworld Continue reading

“The Sorceror” by Grazia Deledda

Nobel Prize-winning weird fiction of a secret midnight rite.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“The Sorceror”

Grazia Deledda

translated from the Italian

They lived at the further end of the little village, one of the strongest and most picturesque villages among the mountains of Logudoro; indeed, their dark and tiny cabin was actually the last of all, and it looked straight down the mountain-side, overgrown with thick clumps of broom and mastic. Continue reading

“As I approach the last of all my days” by Petrarch

Poetry matters more than all else, yet not at all.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“As I approach the last of all my days”

Petrarch

translated from the Italian by Lorna de’ Lucchi

As I approach the last of all my days,
So brief by reason of its dower of pain,
Light-footed time speeds swiftly from my gaze
And faith in him proves profitless and vain.
Then to myself I say: “A little space
And we will sing no more at Love’s behest,
Like snow these earthly chains will melt apace
And we be gathered peacefully to rest.

Since Love must pass away, even so must all
The dreams for which we bartered heaven and earth,
Our fears, our sorrows, and our boist’rous mirth;
Then we shall know how oft it doth befall
That men strive after things of trivial worth,
And sigh for that which matters not at all.”