“Lazarus” by Leonid Andreyev, part 3

The void, versus all.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Lazarus”

Leonid Andreyev

translated from the Russian by Abraham Yarmolinsky

part 3

V

And now it came to pass that the great, deified Augustus himself summoned Lazarus. The imperial messengers dressed him gorgeously, in solemn nuptial clothes, as if Time had legalized them, and he was to remain until his very death the bridegroom of an unknown bride. It was as though an old, rotting coffin had been gilt and furnished with new, gay tassels. And men, all in trim and bright attire, rode after him, as if in bridal procession indeed, and those foremost trumpeted loudly, bidding people to clear the way for the emperor’s messengers. But Lazarus’ way was deserted: his native land cursed the hateful name of him who had miraculously risen from the dead, and people scattered at the very news of his appalling approach. Continue reading

“Lazarus” by Leonid Andreyev, part 2

And all that there is about art.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Lazarus”

Leonid Andreyev

translated from the Russian by Abraham Yarmolinsky

part 2

IV

At that time there lived in Rome a renowned sculptor. In clay, marble, and bronze he wrought bodies of gods and men, and such was their beauty, that people called them immortal. But he himself was discontented and asserted that there was something even more beautiful, that he could not embody either in marble or in bronze. “I have not yet gathered the glimmers of the moon, nor have I my fill of sunshine,” he was wont to say, “and there is no soul in my marble, no life in my beautiful bronze.” And when on moonlight nights he slowly walked along the road, crossing the black shadows of cypresses, his white tunic glittering in the moonshine, those who met him would laugh in a friendly way and say: Continue reading

“Lazarus” by Leonid Andreyev, part 1

Easter Special:
One of the greatest and darkest of all short stories.
⁓The Voice before the Void

“Lazarus”

Leonid Andreyev

translated from the Russian by Abraham Yarmolinsky

part 1

I

When Lazarus left the grave, where, for three days and three nights he had been under the enigmatical sway of death, and returned alive to his dwelling, for a long time no one noticed in him those sinister oddities, which, as time went on, made his very name a terror. Gladdened unspeakably by the sight of him who had been returned to life, those near to him caressed him unceasingly, and satiated their burning desire to serve him, in solicitude for his food and drink and garments. And they dressed him gorgeously, in bright colors of hope and laughter, Continue reading